U.S. President Trump sells weapons to help Japan shoot down North Korean missiles

- U.S. President Trump sells weapons to help Japan shoot down North Korean missiles.

- Trump wants to counter the dangerous aggressions from North Korea.

- Japan willing to shoot down missiles if necessary.
U.S. president Donald Trump has agreed a weapons deal with Japan in a bid to help the country defend itself from the "dangerous aggressions" from the North Korean regime.

Trump
while speaking with the Japanese Prime Minister Abe, stated that once the final batch of weapons are delivered, Japan would be able to "blow North Korean missiles from the sky".

“He (Abe) will shoot them out of the sky when he completes the purchase of lots of additional military equipment from the United States,“ Trump said, referring to the North Korean missiles. ”The prime minister is going to be purchasing massive amounts of military equipment, as he should. And we make the best military equipment by far.”

Abe, for his part, said Tokyo would shoot down missiles “if necessary”.

Trump was replying to a question that was posed to Abe - namely how he would respond to a quote from Trump from a recent interview in which he said Japan was a “samurai” nation and should have shot down the North Korean missiles.

“Most importantly, we’re working to counter the dangerous aggressions of the regime in North Korea,” Trump said, calling Pyongyang’s nuclear tests and recent launches of ballistic missiles over Japan “a threat to the civilized world and to international peace and stability”.

“Some people said that my rhetoric is very strong. But look what’s happened with very weak rhetoric over the last 25 years. Look where we are right now,” he added.

Abe, with whom Trump has bonded through multiple summits and phone calls, repeated at the same news conference that Japan backed Trump’s stance that “all options” are on the table, saying it was time to exert maximum pressure on North Korea and the two countries were “100 percent” together on the issue.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hua Chunying, in response to Abe’s comments, said that the North Korean “situation” was “already extremely complex, sensitive and weak”.

“We hope that under the present circumstances, all sides’ words and actions can help reduce tensions and reestablish mutual trust and getting the North Korean nuclear issue back on the correct track of dialogue and negotiations,” she said.

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